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"Dream, and follow wherever curiosity leads"

Bloomberg School of Public Health biologist Scott Bailey becomes the second recipient of the President's Frontier Award for innovative research
Posted February 18, 2016
Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels (left) presents the President's Frontier Award to Scott Bailey. IMAGE: WILL KIRK/ HOMEWOODPHOTO.JHU.EDU Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels (left) presents the President's Frontier Award to Scott Bailey. IMAGE: WILL KIRK/ HOMEWOODPHOTO.JHU.EDU

Scott Bailey, an associate professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health, has always been driven by a curiosity about cellular structures. That curiosity has led him to explore how to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and pave the way for new treatments for genetic diseases. It's also earned him the second Johns Hopkins University President's Frontier Award.

The Frontier Award, which will recognize one person each year for five years and provide funding for their research expenses, was established in 2014 through a generous gift from Johns Hopkins University trustee Louis J. Forster, A&S '82, SAIS '83, and Kathleen M. Pike, SAIS Bol '81 (Dipl), A&S '82, '83 (MA). The award demonstrates the university's commitment to investing in faculty, a priority of the Rising to the Challenge campaign. 

The purpose of this award "is just to dream, and follow wherever curiosity leads him in advancing his research agenda," said Johns Hopkins University President Ron Daniels, after surprising Bailey in his lab with the $250,000 award.

After receiving the award, Bailey, part of the Bloomberg School's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, immediately began thinking about what his team might do with the Frontier funding.

"With this, you can go after a problem and really take risks with it," says Bailey. "That is where the breakthroughs tend to come."

Read more about Bailey's research and watch a video of his Frontier Award surprise celebration.

Sharon Gerecht, the Kent Gordon Croft Investment Management Faculty Scholar, an associate professor in the Whiting School of Engineering's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and an associate director of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, received the inaugural Frontier Award.